Dimensions of the ESE 100 profile (1" standing seam), formed by the ESE Panformer Model 100.
 
Dimensions of the ESE 150 profile (1-1/2" standing seam), formed by the ESE Panformer Model 150.
 

The image on the right shows the seam dimensions used on ESE panels and are the dimensions recommended for roofing panels to nest perfectly. Note the male leg is actually taller than the female leg.

 

A common, though wrong, practice is to make the male end of a panel shorter than the female end. The theory is that this allows room for the male to fit under the female leg.

This creates a gap at the top between the male and female legs that can make proper seaming difficult or impossible. Also, there is no room for the cleat between the female leg and the deck.

 
When the male leg is longer the female leg rests on it at the top allowing proper seaming. This also leaves .062" (1/16") of clearance between the female leg and the deck for a cleat.
 

Standard 1" fixed cleat. This is a typical cleat used in standing seam roofing.

The cleat is supposed to hold the panel on the roof but should never pull the panel down against the roof.

 

Here the male leg is made shorter than the cleat. In this case the panel can imporperly lift up to make contact with the cleat when it is seamed.

 

Here the female leg is formed properly and is shorter than the cleat and male leg. In this case the female leg nests properly and allows ideal seaming.

 

In addition to allowing good contact between the male and female legs this also leaves room for the cleat between the panel and deck.

 

When the male leg is shorter a gap is produced between the panels that will not allow a proper seam. Also note that there is no room for the cleat between the panel and the deck.

 

To make a point the image on the right shows an extreme example of this. The female leg is normal height but the male leg is ridiculously high. Though the gap between the panel on the left and the deck is absurd the panels themselves can be seamed.

 

This image shows the opposite of the above case. The female leg is exaggerated in height and the male leg is a standard height. The gap between the two panels is so large that there is no way to seam them together.

 
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ESE Machines, Inc. 21 S. Caln Rd. Coatesville, PA 19320 ph.800.854.7361
v3.0 © 2008 ESE Machines, Inc.